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February 19, 2018

The economists’ diet with Rob Barnett

Rob Barnett is the co-author of a new book called The Economists’ Diet, a common sense approach to losing weight that applies basic economic principles to dieting.

Rob and his co-author Christopher Payne met while working at Bloomberg. At the time, Rob was struggling with his weight and soon learned that Chris used to be obese. From these interactions, the Economists’ Diet was born.

Chris and Rob believe that the obesity crisis is largely due to the propensity to overeat. They also viewed the key to change as a focus on behavior more so than nutrition. In both Chris and Rob’s experience, the fundamental starting point for changing their behavior of overeating was stepping on the scale every day. The idea is that if you can’t measure it, you can’t control it. The scale will be reflective of your behavior. This daily practice provides a critical behavioral feedback loop that one will miss out on if not done frequently.

Rob proposes the idea of eating one square meal per day and making other meals smaller. Given our modern, sedentary lifestyle, Rob believes that we really don’t need three normal sized meals per day. In regards to nutrition, the Economists’ Diet uses a common sense approach about what to eat and does not focus on counting calories. Exercise is great, but you can’t exercise your way out of a bad diet.

Rob also discusses the mini feast, mini fast theory. He states that there are inevitable points in time when you will splurge with food because it’s part of life. Feasting is human. If you’re having a big splurge, budget for that by cutting back on other meals that day. Don’t eat a gluttonous meal that is not one of your favorite foods. Make your splurges matter. Fighting obesity is a battle that can be won, but it’s about shifting your thinking and behavior.

To connect with Rob Barnett or to learn more about The Economists’ Diet, visit the book’s website and @econdiet on Twitter.

The 40+ Fitness Podcast is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health-conscious people like runners, cyclist, and weightlifters get lower rates on their life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/40plus to support the show and see if you qualify.

 

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A funeral for my fat | Sharee Samuels

February 12, 2018

The engine 2 cookbook with Rip Esselstyn and Jane Esselstyn

The 40+ Fitness Podcast is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health-conscious people like runners, cyclist, and weightlifters get lower rates on their life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/40plus to support the show and see if you qualify.

Rip Esselstyn and Jane Esselstyn are the authors of The Engine 2 Cookbook, a new book that introduces more than 130 recipes emphasizing the whole foods, plant-based Engine 2 Diet.

Rip Esselstyn served as a firefighter in Austin, Texas for a number of years. In this role, he saw first-hand the culture of toxic food consumption in the firehouse, leading to serious health problems among his fellow firefighters. In March 2003, Rip introduced the Engine 2 Diet and started a healthy eating revolution in the Austin fire department.

While the stereotype exists that men eat meat and other “strong” foods, this meat can actually be detrimental as it only contains protein and fat. Rip explains that fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and seeds are the true superheroes that allow you to be and perform at your best. Fueling the body with plant-based and whole foods are the best options for maintaining energy levels, as the cleanest burning fuel comes from plants.

Jane explains that the concept of batch cooking makes it easy to stick to the program outlined in the Engine 2 Diet. This involves planning and cooking in advance. Jane recommends buying and cooking a larger quantity of food at one time. This food can be consumed throughout the week, requiring only a few minutes of heating prior to eating.

About 80% of the recipes in the book have less than 10 ingredients. These are simple and quick recipes that make it easier to stick with the program.

To learn more about the Engine 2 Cookbook, visit http://www.engine2.com or http://www.janeesselstyn.com. You can also visit Jane’s YouTube channel.

 

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How to not die of heart disease | Dr. Michael Greger


 

February 5, 2018

Healing chinese medicine with Ellen Goldsmith

The 40+ Fitness Podcast is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health-conscious people like runners, cyclist, and weightlifters get lower rates on their life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/40plus to support the show and see if you qualify.

Ellen Goldsmith is the author of Nutritional Healing with Chinese Medicine, a book that discusses the basic ideas of Chinese medicine and how one can apply these ideas in his own life to promote healing through food.

Chinese medicine evolved out of human beings’ observation of nature. It is based on the idea that what is happening outside the body can also happen inside the body. The interaction of the two creates a holistic system where everything is connected. One important belief is that we all come into the world with Chi, the potential behind energy. How we nurture the Chi and adapt to our own condition and elements outside the body are what counts. We can identify any disharmony and determine what needs to be put back in the system to restore balance.

Ellen discusses the importance of the various seasons with Chinese medicine. She explains that the unique flavors of each season help us participate in the activity of the season. During the last three weeks of a season, Ellen recommends eating simple foods and a balanced diet. This helps the digestive system prepare to transition to the next season.

Chinese medicine has specific views when it comes to treating certain medical conditions. Some, such as high cholesterol, are viewed as excess conditions that need to be cleared out. To accomplish this, certain foods must be eliminated from the diet. Similarly, women who experience PMS and painful menses should eliminate foods that are congesting to the liver 7 to 10 days prior to the start of their period. These foods can include fatty foods and baked goods. Ellen recommends resisting cravings and eating a lot of dark, leafy greens. Acupuncture treatment can also be beneficial. Acupuncturists are also a good source for quality Chinese herbs, which can also have health benefits.

To connect with Ellen Goldsmith, email her at elleng@pearlnaturalhealth.com. Nutritional Healing with Chinese Medicine is available for purchase on Amazon.

 

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Ayurveda meets western medicine with Dr. Kulreet Chaudhary

January 22, 2018

Self-Discipline with Natalie Wise

The 40+ Fitness Podcast is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health conscious people like runners, cyclist, and weightlifters get lower rates on their life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/40plus to support the show and see if you qualify.

Natalie Wise is the author of a new book entitled The Self-Discipline Handbook, a guide to building self-discipline and achieving one’s goals through self-exploration.

The Oxford Dictionary describes self-discipline as, “the ability to pursue what one thinks is right despite temptations to abandon it.” As such, Natalie explains that there is no magic start date or age to begin. Every day is a new beginning.

In practicing self-discipline, curiosity is your superpower, as it continuously brings up the question of “what if”. When curious, you’ll keep going and gaining momentum. It creates opportunities to stay on track and feel like you’re doing something new and interesting.

Natalie explains the three types of motivation we experience:

1. Internal – The only motivation that we have control over; something we can cultivate. Heart motivation is all about your why.
2. External – Could easily lead astray because it is focused on the end result rather than who you are.
3. Muse – A random, gifted motivation that is usually short-lived.

In exercising self-discipline, Natalie explains that practicing patience is important. The following actions can help you remain patient:
1. Breathe – calms brain and nervous system
2. Shake it off – exercise and move your body; feel your physical being calm down
3. Change the channel – focus on something else to get through the slump
4. Talk to someone you love – science has proven it has a calming effect
5. Laugh
6. Know when to keep going and when to quit
7. If all else fails, clean – it changes the channel in your mind and allows you to accomplish something

For more information about The Self-Discipline Handbook or to connect with Natalie Wise, visit http://www.nataliewise.com or @goodgirlstyle on Instagram.

 

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Self-discipline and failure with William Ferraiolo

January 15, 2018

Diet for the Mind with Dr. Martha Clare Morris

The 40+ Fitness Podcast is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health conscious people like runners, cyclist, and weightlifters get lower rates on their life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/40plus to support the show and see if you qualify.

Dr. Martha Clare Morris is the creator of the MIND diet and has written a new book entitled Diet for the Mind that details what one should eat to prevent a decline in cognitive ability.

Dr. Morris explains that Alzheimer’s disease is a form of dementia that affects one’s ability to function in life. It is a progressive disease that is characterized by memory loss plus the loss of one other cognitive function.

In creating the MIND diet, Dr. Morris evaluated scientific literature on the brain and nutrition and included core components of both the Mediterranean and DASH diets, as both have been shown to yield strong cardiovascular benefits.

Major components of the MIND diet include:

  • Green leafy vegetables – consumed almost daily along with one other vegetable daily
  • 2 to 5 servings of berries per week and other fruits to your liking
  • At least 1 seafood meal per week
  • Reduce fried food, sweets and pastries, and limit use of butter

Dr. Morris explains that diet and exercise are the primary driving forces for chronic diseases associated with aging. Apart from maintaining proper nutrition, there are other principles to incorporate into one’s lifestyle that can help to prevent or slow the progression of dementia. These include stimulating the brain by challenging one’s self cognitively to build the cognitive reserve and maintaining a positive outlook on life.

More randomized trials are needed to confirm the relation between sleep and a reduced risk. However, sleep appears to be a time of regeneration in the brain when bad proteins are removed.

Diet for the Mind contains more than 80 recipes and is currently available for purchase on Amazon.

 

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FODMAP for gut health with Mollie Tunitsky

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