Category Archives for "fitness"

May 22, 2017

Stretching for better fitness with Dr. Karl Knopf

Dr. Karl Knopf is a teacher of corrective exercise and the founder and President of Fitness Educators of Older Adults. He is also the author of a new book entitled Stretching for 50+

Dr. Knopf explains that many view stretching as boring and not worthwhile, as it is difficult to see immediate results. However, many have learned outdated rules and techniques. Flexibility or stretching is having the ideal amount of mobility in your joints to be able to do what you want to do. The stretching program has to be comprehensive. People need to stretch every aspect of their body, because all parts are interconnected. The beauty of stretching is that it does not require special equipment and can be done anywhere.

Dr. Knopf discusses a few tips for stretching. First, warm up the muscles by jogging or taking a warm shower, for example. Don’t stretch to the point of pain. Remember to breathe regularly as you stretch. Don’t bounce during the stretching process, as those movements can cause micro damage to the muscles. Try not to rush. Check with your health provider to make sure your stretching is appropriate if you’ve recently had an injury.

Dr. Knopf mentions several factors that influence one’s level of flexibility. These include:

  • joint design
  • age
  • gender influence
  • physical activity
  • temperature
  • pregnancy
  • injuries

It’s important to be responsible and take care of yourself to prevent injury. Be proactive, do what feels good, and make stretching a regular part of your life.

The book is designed for all fitness levels and includes illustrations and diagrams. For more information about Stretching for 50+, visit http://www.ulyssespress.com. To connect with Karl, email knopfkarl@foothill.edu.

 

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Forever painless with Miranda Esmonde-White

May 1, 2017

Running injury free using the run walk run method with Jeff Galloway

Jeff Galloway is a seasoned runner, running coach, and author. His book, The Run Walk Run Method, explains his revolutionary system that gives the body rest when it needs it while running, allowing it to become less fatigued and less prone to injury.

The Run Walk Run Method was created when Jeff first began his running store years ago. He taught a beginner’s class in running, in which none of the participants had run in at least five years. To keep them engaged in the program, he added walk breaks to their running. This group remarkably experienced no injuries, as the method allowed the body to adjust to the running motion and avoid injury.

Jeff encourages this technique not only for beginners, but also for seasoned runners during training and the races themselves. He explains that our bodies weren’t designed to run more than about 200 yards at a time. Using the technique not only helps to alleviate stress buildup, but also lessens progressive fatigue, which has been shown to improve running performance times.

For new runners, Jeff recommends determining why you want to run. For complete beginners, he suggests starting with a modest amount of running of no more than 15 to 20 seconds of running, followed by a walking segment of about a minute. This helps to erase the fatigue. For the first month, keep the run walk segments short as you increase the length of the total run walk run. Gradually work your way up to 30 minutes. Don’t rush it and don’t sprint the running segments.

To connect with Jeff or to learn more about The Run Walk Run Method, visit http://www.jeffgalloway.com.

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Run forever with Bill Pierce and Scott Murr

April 26, 2017

Ageless Strength with Jeff Horowitz

 

Jeff Horowitz is a certified running coach and a seasoned marathon runner. He is also the author of the new book, Ageless Strength, which focuses on having the right approach to strength as we age.

Jeff explains that how we age has more to do with how we treat ourselves. As we age, our bodies stop producing as much growth hormone and lose some capability. However, if we focus on building strength, balance, and being functional with improved mobility, we will be better equipped to manage the effects of aging.

Jeff also speaks about thinking of exercise differently, more in terms of the mental component rather than just the physical motions. The goal with exercise is to enhance the number of things we can do, while continually challenging the brain in different ways to solve different problems. This improves our capability of movement and makes exercising more interesting and enjoyable.

One group that will want to focus on building more functional strength is runners, as most of their injuries come from strength imbalance. When a runner’s form is compromised, it causes stress all over the body, which can lead to injury. Runners should focus on maintaining strength laterally, which will enable their bodies to hold their form when they land each step.

The book includes different exercises that focus on meeting the challenges of each area, including strength, balance, and functionality. Create your own custom workout by choosing different exercises among the three sections. Maintain variety in your workouts to keep it challenging and fun, while allowing you to become stronger in a functional way.

To connect with Jeff Horowitz or to learn more about Ageless Strength, visit http://www.runhorowitz.com. You can also purchase the book on Amazon.

 

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Becoming a firebreather with Greg Amundson

April 19, 2017

Run forever with Bill Pierce and Scott Murr

Bill Pierce and Scott Murr are not only friends who have been running together for 35 years, but they are also founders of the Furman Institute of Running and Scientific Training and authors of the new book entitled, Runner’s World: Train Smart, Run Forever.

This new book details how one can become a lifelong runner. Starting a running program or maintaining a runner’s lifestyle can become more difficult over the age of 40. This is partly because we simply cannot train the way we did in our younger years. In addition, connective tissue becomes more rigid with age, which can restrict range of motion and lead to injury. Yet most runners over 40 have the same goal—to be a lifetime runner because it is a central part of their life.

To reach this goal, Bill and Scott discuss several steps that runners can take to make this goal a reality. These include:

  1. Incorporate cross-training, which can keep you fit and active, while also improving your range of motion.
  2. Add strength training to your routine. This helps to maintain muscle mass, which may help you to run faster.
  3. Be sure to stretch, as doing so affects range of motion, which is the foundation of performance.
  4. Add more recovery time in between workouts and hard runs.
  5. Set realistic goals.

To be a healthy, productive runner, Bill and Scott offer these tips:

  1. Make your running fun.
  2. Incorporate variety.
  3. Be consistent.

To connect with Bill and Scott or learn more about their programs and their book, Runner’s World Train Smart, Run Forever, visit http://www.furmanfirst.com.

 

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Diz Runs | Denny Krehe

April 14, 2017

Go from stressed to strong with Laurie A. Watkins

Laurie Watkins is an accomplished speaker, coach, fitness enthusiast, and author of the new book Go From Stressed To Strong.

As a busy professional, Laurie found herself needing to make a change in her life to focus on her health and fitness. She found that building routines worked for her as a means of regaining control. In her book, she describes 20 keys to building a routine. Some of these important keys include:

  1. Start an exercise routine first thing in the morning. Stay consistent and find 20 to 30 minutes per day to workout.
  2. Keep your workout fresh. If you’re not excited, you won’t want to do it.
  3. Set your intentions for the day.
  4. Take time for self-care.
  5. Review highlights of the day before going to sleep and maintain a gratitude list.
  6. Remain motivated and repeat.

Make your routine a priority, but allow for some flexibility. If you don’t make yourself a priority, no one else will. Do more today than you were doing yesterday. Just start somewhere.

Laurie also talks about treating your body like a bank account when it comes to clean and dirty food. She uses the analogy of eating clean foods; doing so is like depositing into your body’s bank account. When you eat enough clean food, you can afford a withdrawal from the bank account to eat the foods you want to indulge in every now and then.

Laurie shares seven additional tips for working out, including:

  1. Work out efficiently
  2. Sign up for competitions as motivation
  3. Make a schedule and commit to it.
  4. Satisfy your own likes and dislikes
  5. Start with one thing.
  6. If you don’t measure it, it doesn’t exist.
  7. Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Visit http://www.laurieawatkins.com to read a chapter called, “Get Out of Bed and Fall Into a Routine,” from her book for free.

 

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Warrior | Theresa Larsen


 

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