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June 5, 2017

Meal timing for weight loss and health

What is the best meal timing for weight loss and health? This question comes up quite a bit online. It is one I find very hard to answer in a simple Facebook post, so I decided to dedicate a full podcast episode to it.

What is the best meal timing for weight loss and health? This question comes up quite a bit online. It is one I find very hard to answer in a simple Facebook post, so I decided to dedicate a full podcast episode to it.

I view eating windows as a continuum much like the political spectrum.  There are different approaches and people are very passionate about defending their place.  Few people are able to objectively look at the full spectrum and see the benefits of each.

The meal timing for weight loss and health spectrum is:

  • Six small meals – timing multiple small meals throughout the day to avoid getting hungry.
  • Workout meal timing – having carbs before the workout and carbs and protein immediately after the workout.
  • Three main meals – having three meals with no snacking permitted.
  • Intermittent fasting
    • 16/8 Intermittent fasting – limiting eating to an eight hour window each day.
    • 5×2 Intermittent fasting – eating normally for five days and having two very low calorie days per week.
  • Extended fasting – fasting for 24 hours or more.

Most people approach meal timing for weight loss.  Before you can effectively lose weight, you'll have to manage your hormones.  Understanding your hormone profile will help you decide where you should be on the continuum.  Most of the approaches are focused on managing blood sugar and thereby insulin.

Lifestyle also plays a big role in determining which meal timing works best for you.  I am often on a 16/8 intermittent fasting approach.  I opt to skip breakfast and have a good lunch and dinner because it would be odd to not be eating when my wife is taking dinner.

All this said, being a sugar burner or fat burner will have the biggest role in determining which meal timing approach you can stick with.  Frequent meals spaced throughout the day works best for sugar burners.  Fat burners are often more comfortable with intermittent fast and extended fasting.

Another episode you may enjoy

Fasting for weight loss with Dr. Jason Fung and Jimmy Moore

May 22, 2017

Stretching for better fitness with Dr. Karl Knopf

Dr. Karl Knopf is a teacher of corrective exercise and the founder and President of Fitness Educators of Older Adults. He is also the author of a new book entitled Stretching for 50+

Dr. Knopf explains that many view stretching as boring and not worthwhile, as it is difficult to see immediate results. However, many have learned outdated rules and techniques. Flexibility or stretching is having the ideal amount of mobility in your joints to be able to do what you want to do. The stretching program has to be comprehensive. People need to stretch every aspect of their body, because all parts are interconnected. The beauty of stretching is that it does not require special equipment and can be done anywhere.

Dr. Knopf discusses a few tips for stretching. First, warm up the muscles by jogging or taking a warm shower, for example. Don’t stretch to the point of pain. Remember to breathe regularly as you stretch. Don’t bounce during the stretching process, as those movements can cause micro damage to the muscles. Try not to rush. Check with your health provider to make sure your stretching is appropriate if you’ve recently had an injury.

Dr. Knopf mentions several factors that influence one’s level of flexibility. These include:

  • joint design
  • age
  • gender influence
  • physical activity
  • temperature
  • pregnancy
  • injuries

It’s important to be responsible and take care of yourself to prevent injury. Be proactive, do what feels good, and make stretching a regular part of your life.

The book is designed for all fitness levels and includes illustrations and diagrams. For more information about Stretching for 50+, visit http://www.ulyssespress.com. To connect with Karl, email knopfkarl@foothill.edu.

 

Another episode you might enjoy

Forever painless with Miranda Esmonde-White

May 17, 2017

Your aging body can talk with Dr. Susan Levy

Dr. Susan Levy is a chiropractor and alternative health practitioner with more than 30 years of experience. She is also the author of the new book, Your Aging Body Can Talk, a guide to help people get in touch with their body’s inner knowingness, which can lead to greater happiness and health.

Dr. Levy speaks about the importance of preserving a youthful feeling and attitude as we go through the aging process, which allows us to be healthier and more comfortable. With this, she discusses the concept of ikigai, an Okinawan tradition that encourages everyone to discover their life’s purpose. Defining and refining one’s ikigai over time has many health benefits, as you are looking at your inherent purpose and self-worth, rather than looking at an outward reflection of accomplishments.

Being sedentary can cause negative effects on human beings. Research has shown the total body benefit of Tai chi includes diminishment of pain, improvement in one’s sense of well-being, and an increase in energy level and stamina, just to name a few. Yoga is good for flexibility and calming the self. Another option is Essentrics, which uses principles from yoga, ballet, and stretching. You can also simply walk with a purpose to stay active. Massage, chiropractic treatment, and acupuncture can also create greater alignment with one’s body.

Dr. Levy discusses her “Move It and Preserve It” basics:

1. Find what’s comfortable for you.
2. Minimize being sedentary.
3. Incorporate more purposeful movement in your daily life.
4. Have variety in your activities.

In regards to nutrition, Dr. Levy recommends including a variety of healthy foods, specifically those that are unprocessed with ingredients that you can recognize and pronounce. Organic and grass-fed options are great. Focus on fruits and vegetables. Use glass containers for food storage. Avoid all processed foods, sodas, tap water, and Styrofoam packaging.

To connect with Dr. Susan Levy or for more information about Your Aging Body Can Talk, visit http://www.yourbodycantalk.com.

 

Another episode you may enjoy

Eliminate chronic pain with Sue Hitzmann

May 12, 2017

Manage your microbiome with Danielle Capalino

Danielle Capalino is a nutritionist specializing in digestive health and the author of a new book entitled The Microbiome Diet Plan.

Danielle describes the microbiome as a collection of mostly bacteria and other microorganisms that live all over us and inside of us. The bacteria inside our intestinal tract serves a variety of important functions including maintaining a healthy weight, maintaining the immune system, producing certain vitamins, and absorbing certain fibers.

Bacteria can be good for us and is vital for our health. However, antibiotics are given out like candy in this day and age, many times when we don’t need them. They do not discriminate and will kill both the good and bad bacteria alike.

Danielle discusses a few guidelines for managing your microbiome. These include:

1. Choose high fiber carbohydrates
2. Eat more plants
3. Eat fermented foods such as pickles and sauerkraut
4. Limit your meat intake
5. Avoid gluten, sugar, and food additives
6. Cultured dairy products are included
7. Consume alcohol in moderation

The six-week program to revitalizing your gut health is broken into two phases. Each phase lasts for three weeks. In both phases, the diet includes rich and fermented foods. However, in the first phase, no added sugar or meat are included. In the second phase, some honey, maple syrup, and meat is added back in.

Danielle recommends making the plan work for you. If you can follow the plan 80% of the time, you are still being successful. Try to use the principles in situations when you have to adjust.

The book includes a shopping list, lists of snacks, and a meal plan for each week. To connect with Danielle or to learn more about The Microbiome Diet Plan, visit www.daniellecapalino.com or reach out to her on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

 

Another episode you may enjoy

Get a happy gut | Dr. Vincent Pedre

May 10, 2017

Dine safe with Nick Caturano

Nick Caturano is the creator behind the new Dine Safe app, an innovative and highly useful app that aims to make dining safer for those with food allergies or sensitivities.

The idea for the Dine Safe app began when Nick noticed an uptick of food allergies and intolerances while he was working in the restaurant industry. As a whole, the industry seemed to be scrambling to keep pace with these new demands. He knew there needed to be a more efficient way to manage the process. He then developed the idea for the Dine Safe app—an easy to use app that would allow users to select restaurants and menu selections based on the dietary preferences they enter into the app.

Additionally, restaurants have the ability to create an account, upload their menus, and tag each item with different characteristics or dietary preferences.

The app lists allergies and diet choices, including up to 33 allergens; however, restaurants only need to include at least the top eight allergens to join. Nutritional information is also tracked.

While there are other apps out there that help to provide information based on specific dietary preferences, the information provided is based on user reviews. The transparency of the Dine Safe app allows people to feel more comfortable, as they are getting the information straight from the restaurant itself.

Right now, both user and restaurant support is needed to increase usage and demand for the Dine Safe app to expand its reach. If you like the concept, talk to owners of local restaurants to help get them on board.

To download the Dine Safe app, search the Apple or Android store under Dine Safe. To connect with Nick, to learn more about the app, or for restaurants to create an account, visit the website at http://www.dinesafeapp.com.

 

Another episode you may enjoy

Big fat food fraud with Jeff Scot Philips

 

 

 

 

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