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January 16, 2016

Mike finds happy trails

Mike BeforeMike has an inspiring story. He embarked upon a health and fitness journey and in the process found happy trails. At 56 years old, Mike was living a sedentary lifestyle and gained a lot of weight. His wake-up call occurred when a good friend, who was three years younger and more active, almost passed away from a heart attack. He knew he needed to make a change.

Mike started off slowly. He took out his old bike and began riding again on flat trails nearby. The first few miles were tough, but he soon gained endurance and began riding further. Then he added swimming laps to the mix. Finally, he began using his gym equipment at home and later joined a gym.

In addition to his physical activity, Mike began tracking his calorie intake on My Fitness Pal. He soon realized he was overeating by about 2,000 calories per day! A big soda fan, Mike was challenged by his son to cut out the soft drinks. He also began eating food with fresh ingredients, including fish and vegetables. When he made these changes, he really noticed the weight coming off. When he went to see his cardiologist, the doctor was very happy with his progress. To date, Mike has lost a total of 42 pounds.

Mike Current

Mike’s two tips include:

  1. Find an exercise you enjoy. Mike picked bicycling because he knew he would enjoy it and could make measurable progress. He set goals that were attainable and measurable.
  1. Have a good support group. If you don’t have friends and family, use My Fitness Pal, which has a lot of great information and encouraging people.

Mike has found happy trails and you can too! To connect with Mike directly, find him on My Fitness Pal as happytrails7 or check out his group called 50 Plus (or so) Support Group.

 

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 14, 2016

Low carb versus low fat diets

Have you ever wondered about the science behind low fat and low carb diets? Which one is better?

In a study from 2003, 40 people between the ages of 24 and 61 were evaluated during a 10-week program. This program looked at health outcomes as a result of being part of a low carb or low fat diet.

Those within the low carb diet had no more than 15% of their calories coming from carbohydrates. Those within the low fat diet had less than 18% fat in their diet. In the end, both groups improved and lost nearly the same amount of weight, with the low fat group having lost 18.2 pounds on average and the low carb group having lost an average of 18.8 pounds.

In addition, both groups lowered their triglycerides and cardiovascular risk. However, the low carb diet increased their HDL but saw no change in LDL. The low fat diet saw improved insulin sensitivity, whereas the low carb group saw no change with this. The low carb group also saw their ketones increase, while the low fat group did not experience this.

So both diets worked well in their own ways and showed weight loss. But how do you decide what will work best for you? To do this, you have to prioritize what matters most to you. If you want to impact your insulin sensitivity, perhaps the low fat diet is for you. If you want to see your ketones increase, then the low carb diet might be the right choice.

Ultimately, the right choice for you is the one that will work with your lifestyle. If the changes are not sustainable in the long-term, it won’t be the right fit. Consider what food you have access to and the nature of your everyday lifestyle. Be realistic. If you know you cannot give up bread and carbs, then perhaps the low carb diet is not for you. Choose one or the other and stick with it. The choice over a low fat or low carb diet is truly yours to make!

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 13, 2016

Can fasting be a healthy solution for weight loss | Jimmy Moore

This is part three of a three-part series with Jimmy Moore. If you are yet to listen to previous two parts, I recommend you to go back and listen to those.

Jimmy has been experimenting with fasting for a while. In fact, he was in his day fifteen of his fasting at the time of recording of this podcast. As he fasts quite often, it has become quite easy for him to forget to eat. Fasting for a period of 16 to 24 hours was no big deal for him because of his past and because he had been 410 pounds. In this regard, Jimmy consulted with Toronto-based Nephrologist doctor Jason Fung. Jimmy is currently collaborating a book called “Fasting Clarity” with him. Dr. Fung recommends fasting for periods of one to two weeks. Dr. Thomas Seyfried from Boston College advocates fasting for a week each year to prevent cancer.

It was a couple month ago when Jimmy started his first long fast. At the time of fasting, he drinks water, bone broth with sea salt, and kombucha. At the time of his fasting, Jimmy consumes about 100 calories per day. During a recent 17 1/2 day fasts, he lost 19 pounds. He was happy with the outcome. He is documenting every small detail so that he can include his findings in his book next year.

Jimmy wonders why fasting is not recommended more by medical professionals. Even temporary period of fasting can do well for our health. One reason he is writing his book is he wants people to know the benefits of fasting.

The scoop on ketosis with Jimmy Moore

 

Understanding cholesterol with Jimmy Moore

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 12, 2016

John and Tammy commit to health and fitness

In this episode, we meet Forever Fitness clients John and Tammy and talk about committing to health and fitness.

The commitment to health and fitness is the same as committing to your spouse. But committing to your health and fitness is something that you should not do for your spouse. You need to have self-love and do it for yourself.
Allan believes that making a verbal commitment is important. One needs to make vows to oneself about his or her commitment to be fit. One needs to write his or her vows, read it and feel it from heart.

Tammy admits she's uncomfortable  expressing that she wants to look better. Allan notes that when you take care of yourself and your body is good and healthy from inside, you should look better. There is no reason to feel ashamed of saying that because being healthy and looking better is effectively the same thing. One can’t look better unless he or she is healthy. Tammy finally clearly and confidently says she does want to be healthy and proud. And it’s important for every individual to say and feel his or her commitment to health and fitness.

Tammy finally clearly and confidently says she does want to be healthy and proud. And it’s important for every individual to say and feel his or her commitment to health and fitness.
John indicates he is inspired to push hard to reach his health and fitness goals. He is ready to make this commitment. John wants to have a long healthy life. That’s why he needs to make a vow to himself about his commitment to health and fitness.
John makes his vow saying “I John, commit to training my body for a happy, healthy future”.

 

Meet my clients John and Tammy

Tweaking to fit

January 11, 2016

Dealing with weight loss plateaus

In a health and fitness journey, there is one certainty. At one point or another, progress will slow and a weight loss plateau may occur. You may be doing all the right things, but the weight has simply stopped coming off. Perhaps the number on the scale is ebbing and flowing. This can last for days, weeks, or even months in a weight loss plateau.

Do a self-evaluation. Evaluate the quality and quantity of your food. Did you stop eating well? Start doing your food logs again. Are you stressed? A cortisol response with stress could be causing your body to store fat. If you’re having trouble being objective, you may consider bringing in a coach for ideas on how to improve.

Don’t overlook the importance of progression and patience. Over time, you will see great progression. At first, you may see drastic improvements—big losses of body fat and advances in strength. But over time, your body will level out in this plateau. You may come out of a plateau, only to end up in another plateau yet again. This is normal. Your body is trying to find balance.

Make sure you’re looking at several different measurements, not just the number on the scale. Check out this free infographic, 7 Health and Fitness Measures That Matter, to consider some other measurements. If you’re not seeing progress in one area, chances are you will see progress in other areas.

The key is to focus on health first. Stay on the plan. Don’t panic and don’t quit. Continue to work on what is showing results, keep progressing, and tweak the plan as you go. Have the patience to stay the course and you will overcome this temporary weight loss plateau.

 

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

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