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January 20, 2016

Self love for health and fitness | Kim Knight

Today, we have Kim Night. Kim is a health and personal transformation coach living in Auckland, New Zealand. She shows people how to identify and resolve the absolute root cause of chronic physical pain or fatigue without medication or supplements. She also specializes in stress and anxiety with action. 99 percent of her work with clients is carried out remotely over phone, through online webinars, and online self-help programs. Her professional training and client experience are extensive.

Unable to work for over 10 years, her own recovery from CFS, anxiety and clinical depression led her to try over 160 different therapies on her journey back to health.

Kim says she dealt with a lot of people and she includes herself in that list. When she was a kid, she loved doing sports. She talks about limiting beliefs deep in the unconscious that make her feel bad. She thinks our limiting beliefs limit us from being happy or healthy. That’s why she feels it’s important to identify these limiting beliefs. Limiting beliefs such as “I am unworthy” kind of destroy us. I am unworthy and I am not good enough are common limiting beliefs among many.  That’s why she believes we need to re-empower ourselves. We are designed to be happy, healthy and joyful. That is our natural state. If you have these limiting beliefs running in the subconscious, it does not matter what you say in your conscious level and will stop us every time.

Kim believes we need self-discipline and willpower to push ourselves through into good practice and do whatever makes us happy. She says we need to understand it’s about self-love and self-respect. When we do good things for ourselves like eat well or exercise, we are loving, caring and respecting ourselves.

So, when we want to achieve something or anything, we have to have self-love.

Here are relevant links:

Main website http://thekiwihealthdetective.com/

Free Mickel Series  www.mickeltherapy.co.nz

Qigong website: www.taohealthqigong.com

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/KimKnightArtofHealth

The love diet | Dr. Connie Gutterson

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 19, 2016

Tweaking to fit

In this client episode, John and Tammy evaluate their progress thus far and consider tweaking their program just a bit. They’re making progressions and improving their form, but they realize that alcohol consumption is also part of the equation. After all, alcohol calories are sugar. In the future, they will need to look at their volume and manage it against what other sugars they are consuming. Another important factor to consider is water consumption. They will want to keep drinking water to counteract the dehydrating effect with alcohol.

When evaluating their diet, John and Tammy recognize they are eating a lot of basic carbs—essentially eating a basic American diet. This will be one of the areas to tweak. They will reduce their carb intake, and once they start lifting weights, shift more to protein consumption than the carbohydrates.

Regarding their exercise plan, John is noticing his knees are more flexible and he’s having less pain at work. He’s doing push-ups, but would like to do more upper body work. Another tweak will involve starting push-ups in the standard position, not on his knees, and then dropping to his knees when he begins to struggle with his form.

Tammy mentioned she was having a bit of trouble with squats. While she is holding onto a chair to keep her balance, she will now try using the chair as part of her squat. She will adjust her positioning so that when she squats, her bottom will touch the edge of the chair, which will help take some of the pressure off her legs.

The key is to build the basic foundation and continue tweaking along the way. In the beginning stages, it will seem like progress is limited when you can only complete a small set. However, as progression grows, John and Tammy will be able to take on more reps and see a real improvement.

 

John and Tammy commit to health and fitness

Progression for results

January 18, 2016

Be a lab rat to find health and fitness

Want to know how you can get the best results for you? Become a lab rat to find your path to health and fitness! You can evaluate study data to see what might work best for you. Be wary of advice you see in the press or attention-grabbing headlines. Some of this is often based in fear-mongering to grab your interest. To be successful, you need to reflect about the true nature of the study. Usually, there is a test and control group to do a compare and contrast of results, from which statistically valid conclusions are drawn.

Some studies are metastudies. This is where several studies are evaluated and data is extrapolated to develop a new conclusion or bolster a prior conclusion. Look at how they were designed and pick apart why one was different than the other.

Some studies may have general assumptions. Analyze the data and think critically about the information that is presented. Some studies may include a very limited number of participants. The backbone of a good study will have a large pool of participants. Other studies may have bias or influence. In fact, some supplement companies will pay for a clinical study to be done. Be cautious of this as well.

All this being said, you have the opportunity to do experiments on yourself to be well-controlled. First, you must define your experiment. Determine how you will go about it and what your criteria will be. Do you want to lose five or 10 pounds in four weeks? Write that information down and keep track of your data. Want to try a low fat diet? Be clear on what that means to you so you can assess properly.

In the end, if you use common sense and do your research, you will be able to apply study findings to your own journey. Test something that you can sustain over time. If it works for you, systemize the program and make it a part of your daily life. Think of yourself as your own experiment—a lab rat on a journey to better health and fitness!

When what works for them doesn't work for you

 

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 16, 2016

Mike finds happy trails

Mike BeforeMike has an inspiring story. He embarked upon a health and fitness journey and in the process found happy trails. At 56 years old, Mike was living a sedentary lifestyle and gained a lot of weight. His wake-up call occurred when a good friend, who was three years younger and more active, almost passed away from a heart attack. He knew he needed to make a change.

Mike started off slowly. He took out his old bike and began riding again on flat trails nearby. The first few miles were tough, but he soon gained endurance and began riding further. Then he added swimming laps to the mix. Finally, he began using his gym equipment at home and later joined a gym.

In addition to his physical activity, Mike began tracking his calorie intake on My Fitness Pal. He soon realized he was overeating by about 2,000 calories per day! A big soda fan, Mike was challenged by his son to cut out the soft drinks. He also began eating food with fresh ingredients, including fish and vegetables. When he made these changes, he really noticed the weight coming off. When he went to see his cardiologist, the doctor was very happy with his progress. To date, Mike has lost a total of 42 pounds.

Mike Current

Mike’s two tips include:

  1. Find an exercise you enjoy. Mike picked bicycling because he knew he would enjoy it and could make measurable progress. He set goals that were attainable and measurable.
  1. Have a good support group. If you don’t have friends and family, use My Fitness Pal, which has a lot of great information and encouraging people.

Mike has found happy trails and you can too! To connect with Mike directly, find him on My Fitness Pal as happytrails7 or check out his group called 50 Plus (or so) Support Group.

 

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 14, 2016

Low carb versus low fat diets

Have you ever wondered about the science behind low fat and low carb diets? Which one is better?

In a study from 2003, 40 people between the ages of 24 and 61 were evaluated during a 10-week program. This program looked at health outcomes as a result of being part of a low carb or low fat diet.

Those within the low carb diet had no more than 15% of their calories coming from carbohydrates. Those within the low fat diet had less than 18% fat in their diet. In the end, both groups improved and lost nearly the same amount of weight, with the low fat group having lost 18.2 pounds on average and the low carb group having lost an average of 18.8 pounds.

In addition, both groups lowered their triglycerides and cardiovascular risk. However, the low carb diet increased their HDL but saw no change in LDL. The low fat diet saw improved insulin sensitivity, whereas the low carb group saw no change with this. The low carb group also saw their ketones increase, while the low fat group did not experience this.

So both diets worked well in their own ways and showed weight loss. But how do you decide what will work best for you? To do this, you have to prioritize what matters most to you. If you want to impact your insulin sensitivity, perhaps the low fat diet is for you. If you want to see your ketones increase, then the low carb diet might be the right choice.

Ultimately, the right choice for you is the one that will work with your lifestyle. If the changes are not sustainable in the long-term, it won’t be the right fit. Consider what food you have access to and the nature of your everyday lifestyle. Be realistic. If you know you cannot give up bread and carbs, then perhaps the low carb diet is not for you. Choose one or the other and stick with it. The choice over a low fat or low carb diet is truly yours to make!

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 13, 2016

Can fasting be a healthy solution for weight loss | Jimmy Moore

This is part three of a three-part series with Jimmy Moore. If you are yet to listen to previous two parts, I recommend you to go back and listen to those.

Jimmy has been experimenting with fasting for a while. In fact, he was in his day fifteen of his fasting at the time of recording of this podcast. As he fasts quite often, it has become quite easy for him to forget to eat. Fasting for a period of 16 to 24 hours was no big deal for him because of his past and because he had been 410 pounds. In this regard, Jimmy consulted with Toronto-based Nephrologist doctor Jason Fung. Jimmy is currently collaborating a book called “Fasting Clarity” with him. Dr. Fung recommends fasting for periods of one to two weeks. Dr. Thomas Seyfried from Boston College advocates fasting for a week each year to prevent cancer.

It was a couple month ago when Jimmy started his first long fast. At the time of fasting, he drinks water, bone broth with sea salt, and kombucha. At the time of his fasting, Jimmy consumes about 100 calories per day. During a recent 17 1/2 day fasts, he lost 19 pounds. He was happy with the outcome. He is documenting every small detail so that he can include his findings in his book next year.

Jimmy wonders why fasting is not recommended more by medical professionals. Even temporary period of fasting can do well for our health. One reason he is writing his book is he wants people to know the benefits of fasting.

The scoop on ketosis with Jimmy Moore

 

Understanding cholesterol with Jimmy Moore

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 12, 2016

John and Tammy commit to health and fitness

In this episode, we meet Forever Fitness clients John and Tammy and talk about committing to health and fitness.

The commitment to health and fitness is the same as committing to your spouse. But committing to your health and fitness is something that you should not do for your spouse. You need to have self-love and do it for yourself.
Allan believes that making a verbal commitment is important. One needs to make vows to oneself about his or her commitment to be fit. One needs to write his or her vows, read it and feel it from heart.

Tammy admits she's uncomfortable  expressing that she wants to look better. Allan notes that when you take care of yourself and your body is good and healthy from inside, you should look better. There is no reason to feel ashamed of saying that because being healthy and looking better is effectively the same thing. One can’t look better unless he or she is healthy. Tammy finally clearly and confidently says she does want to be healthy and proud. And it’s important for every individual to say and feel his or her commitment to health and fitness.

Tammy finally clearly and confidently says she does want to be healthy and proud. And it’s important for every individual to say and feel his or her commitment to health and fitness.
John indicates he is inspired to push hard to reach his health and fitness goals. He is ready to make this commitment. John wants to have a long healthy life. That’s why he needs to make a vow to himself about his commitment to health and fitness.
John makes his vow saying “I John, commit to training my body for a happy, healthy future”.

 

Meet my clients John and Tammy

Tweaking to fit

January 11, 2016

Dealing with weight loss plateaus

In a health and fitness journey, there is one certainty. At one point or another, progress will slow and a weight loss plateau may occur. You may be doing all the right things, but the weight has simply stopped coming off. Perhaps the number on the scale is ebbing and flowing. This can last for days, weeks, or even months in a weight loss plateau.

Do a self-evaluation. Evaluate the quality and quantity of your food. Did you stop eating well? Start doing your food logs again. Are you stressed? A cortisol response with stress could be causing your body to store fat. If you’re having trouble being objective, you may consider bringing in a coach for ideas on how to improve.

Don’t overlook the importance of progression and patience. Over time, you will see great progression. At first, you may see drastic improvements—big losses of body fat and advances in strength. But over time, your body will level out in this plateau. You may come out of a plateau, only to end up in another plateau yet again. This is normal. Your body is trying to find balance.

Make sure you’re looking at several different measurements, not just the number on the scale. Check out this free infographic, 7 Health and Fitness Measures That Matter, to consider some other measurements. If you’re not seeing progress in one area, chances are you will see progress in other areas.

The key is to focus on health first. Stay on the plan. Don’t panic and don’t quit. Continue to work on what is showing results, keep progressing, and tweak the plan as you go. Have the patience to stay the course and you will overcome this temporary weight loss plateau.

 

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 8, 2016

Barbara takes charge

BarbaraMeet Barbara. She has an interesting and uplifting story to share.

Barbara used to be a professional athlete and traveled all over the world. In her late twenties, she was diagnosed with a severe illness called crone’s disease.

She managed it quite well for several years.

But in 2010, the disease reared its ugly head again. She had her first surgery, which was an ileostomy pouch. She had another surgery in 2011. In 2014, she ended up developing a huge mass. She was forced to sell her firm and change her lifestyle. She became quite depressed and anxious.

Barbara feels lucky to have her a child in her thirties when her disease was in remission.  That is because often crone’s can affect the fertility. She calls her son her miracle child.

However, her health continued to decline. She gained a bit of weight. She was diagnosed with cancer and had a total hysterectomy.

But that was when Barbara decided to change.

She found the program named Radical Body Transformation as she was going for her 4th surgery. It is not just a weight-loss program; it is a program with an emphasis in body building. The program clicked for her and changed her life.

Under the program, Barbara is set up with a professional body builder trainer. She got her own diet program, nutritional, cardio, and weight training. She trains six days a week. This is a real intensive, weight-lifting, cardio fitness program that she is going through. And she is doing well.

She has managed to work around having the permanent ileostomy pouch. And she is working toward being more fit than ever. She hopes to compete in an upcoming bodybuilding competition, although she's been put on notice that the pouch, which cannot be hidden during the competition, will likely hurt her chances of placing.

You don't have to train to be a competitive bodybuilder, but find something to strive for and start your health and fitness journey today!

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 7, 2016

Does music help during exercise?

In this science episode, we discuss the value of music in physical exercise. We normally think music kind of makes exercising easier. Is that true?

Let's see what science says about it.

There are some really interesting findings by some recent research. Yes, there are plenty of studies that have found all kinds of benefits of including music in exercise. According to researches, some of the common benefits of including music in exercise include:

  • increase in intake of oxygen,
  • decrease in blood pressure,
  • increase of flexibility, and
  • improvement of co-ordination.

The selection of music is an important factor when it comes to getting these benefits. Say for example; when you are walking for stress relief, you should not listen to hard music.  You should choose something soft and mild.  Conversely, a faster or harder beat can help you push harder when your running or lifting weights.

Unlike how you can get fully into the music when you're on a treadmill or elliptical, you should make sure you are aware of your surroundings when running outdoors or while weightlifting.

You should also consider the value of dance.  Dancing is movement and has some great health and fitness benefits.  If you enjoy dancing, then go for it!

Music can be quite beneficial during exercise, but there are some times when it is unsafe or inappropriate.  Look for ways incorporate music into your workout.  Dance when the spirt hits you.

The value of play part 1

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

January 6, 2016

The scoop on ketosis with Jimmy Moore

Today we have an energetic discussion with Jimmy Moore, author of Keto Clarity. This is the second part of my earlier interview (Episode 18) with Jimmy.   In this episode, we will focus on the concept of nutritional ketosis as an important tool for fat loss.

Jimmy Moore is best known for his “Livin’ LaVida Low-Carb” blog and podcast.   In 2004, at 32 years of age and 410 pounds, Jimmy made the decision to take off the weight that was literally killing him. The time had come for a radical lifestyle change.   A year later, he had lost 180 pounds and shrunk his waistline by 20 inches. This phenomenal weight loss enabled him to come off prescription drugs for high cholesterol, high blood pressure and respiratory problems. This dramatic change sparked his dedication to helping others find the information they need to make the kind of lifestyle changes he has made.

Jimmy discussed ketosis as the process for letting your body become a fat burning machine rather than a sugar burning machine.   When you eat a lot of carbohydrates, your body is a sugar burner. In ketosis, you shift the body from a sugar burner over to a fat burner.   Choosing high quality sources of carbohydrates, such as non-starchy vegetables and green, leafy vegetables and some berries is part of the process. It is a balancing act, though, as too much protein will also inhibit the body’s ability to get into a ketogenic state.

Along with his blog and podcasts, Jimmy Moore is also the author of The Ketogenic Cookbook, Keto Clarity and Cholesterol Clarity. Learn more about ketosis, Jimmy Moore and his work at www.livinlavidalowcarb.com.

Understanding cholesterol with Jimmy Moore

Can fasting be a healthy solution for weight loss | Jimmy Moore

Music: Ben Sound Royalty Free Music

January 5, 2016

Meet my clients John and Tammy

In this episode of the 40+ Fitness podcast, we meet two Forever Fitness clients, John and Tammy to talk about committing to health and fitness.

Tammy and Allan discuss the nature of a commitment to health and fitness, relating to the same emotional and life-long commitment you make to your spouse (John and Tammy were recently married). However, the health and fitness commitment is not something that you should not do for your spouse, or anyone else. It is an expression of true self-love. A commitment to health and fitness is personal.

Allan believes that making a verbal commitment to oneself is important. Allan suggests Tammy and John write his or her vows read them and feel them from the heart.

Tammy was very uncomfortable saying she wanted to look better. Allan points out that when you take care of yourself and your body is healthy inside and out, you already look better. One can’t look better unless he or she is healthy. Tammy finally clearly and confidently says she does want to be healthy and proud.

John goes next. He is inspired to push hard for reaching his health and fitness goals. He is ready to make this commitment loudly and clearly. John wants to have a long healthy life, which is why he agreed to work with Allan.

If you want more information about working with Allan, go to Forever Fitness.

 

John and Tammy commit to health and fitness

Music: Ben Sound Royalty Free Music

January 4, 2016

The fountain of life – water

While everybody knows water is essential, most people make no effort to ensure they're getting enough water daily. Three-quarters of the earth is covered with water. Nearly as much of the human body is water as well.

We can go a month or even more without food but you can only go a few days without water. Water is that important. We get some of the water we need from the foods we eat.  As a consequence, when you feel hungry, you may actually be thirsty.  For that reason, I usually recommend to my clients that they drink water when they feel hungry and wait 15 minutes to see if the hunger fades.

Now, let's get into some of the biology of water and what it does for us.

Muscle

When we work a muscle, the muscle draws in water to aid in the repair.  The water is valuable for flushing out toxins created by the workout.  That’s why it’s recommended you take enough water after a good heavy workout.

Organs

A vast majority of the water we take goes to our most critical organs like kidneys, the brain, and the liver. If you are not enough water, the functions of those critical organs will be interrupted. In your weight-loss process, you need to ensure you take in enough water to help your liver and kidneys can handle the toxins being released from the stored fat.

 

I recommend you drink 60-100 ounces of water every day.

How alcohol affects health and fitness


Music: Ben Sound Royalty Free Music

 

January 1, 2016

Julie gets fit

Julie gets fitIn this episode, Julie shares her journey to fitness from fat to fit. Approaching her forties; a sedentary desk job and a love for food had put her at the lower end of obese.

To get fit she joined My Fitness Pal, where she learned to track calories.  At the beginning, she maintained a daily allowance of 1200 calories. She also took up walking to burn off extra calories.

Then she discovered resistance training, also called weight or strength training. This training:

  • Body recomposition
  • Promotes weight loss
  • Burns fat
  • Affects bone density, thereby prevents/delays osteoporosis; and
  • Develops the upper body strength.

She signed on to women’s 5×5 weight lifting community. She bought herself a bench press from the Dicks Sporting Goods. She watched the videos on the lifts and learned the 5×5 Stronglifts Program.

For the starters, Julie recommends:

  • Watching the videos to ensure you understand the form
  • Getting comfortable and well acquainted with the equipment and the exercise
  • Doing the research
  • Being patient with the injuries
  • Dedication

To learn form:

  • Start with the broomstick or no weight if necessary.
  • Work in front of a full-length mirror and practice the motions of a lift.
  • You can also videotape yourself for review.
  • Start small, then progress (low weight or studio bar of 5 then 10 pounds).

She found that once she started lifting weights her calorie allowance increased so she could indulge herself while maintaining a deficit. She kept track of her calorie intake every day since last 3 years and is in great shape.

Julie’s transformation set her on a path not unlike Allan’s. She is working towards a personal trainer certificate and plans to work with older adults.

Hope Julie gets fit has inspired you towards your own fitness plan. Get in touch with at her blog – https://musingsfromaworkaholic.com/.

Patterns of success in weight loss

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music

December 31, 2015

How alcohol affects health and fitness

In this science episode, we discuss alcohol. It’s a topic that comes quite often when I deal with my clients. They ask whether they can consume alcohol in their health and fitness journey. The answer, that isn't really an answer for this question is “it depends.”

A March 2013 study found that the chronic alcohol consumption reduces testosterone and increases cholesterol, both of which are not good for muscle growth and muscle retention. Therefore, chronic use of alcohol is not recommended. Moderate alcohol consumption may be okay. But you need to understand what is moderate. Just to give you a number, something less than 7 drinks a week should be okay.

There are other studies that may help you set your strategy. A March 2015 study on “Alcohol, Obesity and Loss of Strength” found alcohol use reduces our strength. Another 2015 study on “the lifestyle factors in associated with successful weight-loss” found that losing weight is co-related with a healthier lifestyle which includes drinking less alcohol.

After seeing results like this, it may seem like it is best to quit drinking entirely. But that may not be practical. So, the goal should be to build healthy habits that we can keep over time. Gradual changes of habits are more sustainable, which will lead to a healthier lifestyle.

So, an individual needs to determine what is going to work for him or her. One perfect way to deal with alcohol is treating it like sugar. Sugar is one of the things that create fat in our body. Alcohol works almost exactly the same way.

Links for further reading:

Nutrition and Metabolism Article

Phys Reports Article

Springer Article 

T and F Online

Now you are better informed of how you should deal with alcohol in your health and fitness journey.

The fountain of life – water

Music used for the podcast Intro and Outro: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music